Blog Posts in Category: Property Management

12/04/2019

7 Home Security tips to prevent burglaries

7 Home Security tips to prevent burglaries

Every 18 seconds another preventable break-in will occur in the United States, totaling to over 200 break-ins within an hour. The average monthly cost for home security monitoring services is $30/month ($360/year). Monitoring prices can be as low as $9.99/month ($120/year) for basic monitoring, and upwards of $100/month ($1,200 annually) for more premium services with complex devices. Even though implementing proper home security can become expensive, there are small steps you can take to improve home security and genuine feelings of serenity before leaving your home. Lock your door and windows This appears to be a conspicuous tip, yet 30 percent of thieves report breaking into a home through an opened window or entryway. Life gets occupied and we hurry to work, school, and activities. Take a couple of moments before you leave to check the entryways and as of late opened windows on the primary level. In the event that you'll forget to, stick a note in your entryway to remind yourself before exiting. Additionally, do not forget to close your blinds and curtains. Prior to entering a home, a robber needs to realize what they're going to take. A planned home break-in's duration typically lasts between 6-12 minutes, therefore burglars will investigate a home's valuables through windows before the break-in.
Train your dog Appropriately prepared pooches are Effective at hindering home invaders. While they are able to defend themselves by biting, their loud barking can cause intruders to panic and caution somebody of the bulgar's presence.   more...

11/06/2019

Resources for Unlawful Evictions

Resources for Unlawful Evictions

The Tenant Protection Act caps annual rent increases at 5% plus inflation, while also forcing landlords to specify a legitimate reason for evicting tenants and to offer relocation assistance for no-fault evictions. While AB 1482: California’s new tenant protection act is set to take effect on January 1st, 2020. Many California residents find themselves receiving wrongful eviction notices from Landlords of their respective homes.
We have received calls from recently evicted tenants of competitor Property Management companies, to discuss their options for resolving these matters and finding new homes to reside. It is unclear if the actions of some landlords are motivated by the new law, or simply profit-maximizing. But Advent Properties, Inc. takes pride in conducting every precautionary step to verify that Property Owners we work with are knowledgeable of rental laws, and never abuse this method of unjust evictions.   more...

11/01/2019

The Rising Competition between Move-Up & First-Time Buyers

The Rising Competition between Move-Up & First-Time Buyers

A recent report from Realtor.com® confirms that lower mortgage rates have piqued the interest of more buyers this fall. However, the consistently shrinking inventory of lower-cost homes is not keeping up with the high demand of buyers.
Highlights: • In September, inventory levels were 2.5% lower than a year ago • Mid-market homes—those priced between $200,000 to $750,000, which make up the largest segment of housing inventory—showed zero percent growth in September. • “The mid-tier of housing represents nearly 60 percent of homes for sale on the market, making it a solid indicator of how tight inventory levels are in the U.S.,” says George Ratiu, senior economist for realtor.com®. • Further, homes available under $200,000—the entry-level tier--have decreased 10% over the last year. • Meanwhile, homes listed for sale over $750,000 continued to grow, in September reaching 4.7 percent over levels from a year ago. • However, realtor.com® economists note that if strong homebuying demand, fueled by lower interest rates, continues to persist into the fall, the inventory of homes in this upper-tier price range also could see declines by February of the coming year. • “While lower mortgage rates and the arrival of fall promised a reprieve, conditions continue to tighten as demand remains strong. September inventory trends, especially in the mid-market, may be the canary in the coal mine that we could be headed for even lower levels of inventory in early 2020.” • The median list price nationwide in September was $305,000, up 4.3% over last year. Nationally, homes sold at an average of 65 days in September, one day slower than a year ago. Tell us your thoughts below: • How can move-up buyers edge the first-time buyer competition? • What are some ways that first-time buyers can top move-up buyers in search of lower-cost homes? For More Information set up an appointment to speak with Darryl Glass, our lead Realtor and Broker Associate by clicking here: Darryl's Calendly   more...

10/31/2019

California's New Tenant Protection Act & How it Affects YOU!

California's New Tenant Protection Act & How it Affects YOU!

AB 1482, California's New Tenant Protection Act can get pretty legal pretty fast, so here is what you need to know at a glance:
What the Rent Caps mean to you: • Starting in January 2020, landlords of multi-family buildings (2 or more apartments) cannot increase your rent by more than 10% annually unless local stricter rent control applies. • If you are in a multi-family home in a non-rent-controlled city and received a rent increase of OVER 7.8% between March 15th, 2019 and December 31st, 2019 - On January 1st, 2020, your rent will be reduced to reflect only a 7.8% increase. • Single Family homes not owned by a corporation are exempt from this rent cap law still. What the “Just Cause” Ordinance means to you: • Landlords CANNOT conduct No-Fault Evictions without paying you (the tenant) a relocation payment of one month’s rent or what the local laws state if you are in a rent and eviction controlled city. • However, Landlords CAN evict residents for consecutive delayed rent payments, due to a breach in contract, especially if the resident lived in the unit for less than one year. We are anticipating questions about both the Tenant Protection Ordinance, and about its effects on local ordinances. Please call (510) 500-7531) or email (dglass@adventpropertiesinc.com), and we will help answer your questions and concerns.   more...

10/25/2019

10 Home Decor Trends on Their Way Out This Winter

10 Home Decor Trends on Their Way Out This Winter

Home Trends can make your home feel and look new and refreshing, but they can also make your home feel outdated and uncomfortable. Some trends reach their end date while some become timeless. You might be asking yourself “How can I tell when my home needs to be renovated?” The most common method of staying up-to-date is to find blogs, influencers, and catalogs that fit the moods you want to show inside and outside of your home. You can modernize your home with small details like adding wallpaper, plants, and accents. Or you could go big and paint your rooms, order new furniture, or even add/remove the carpet. But remember, trends change like the seasons. So here is a list of 10 Home Decor Trends we’ve noticed that are losing their appeal this forthcoming Winter Season. 1. Fake Plants Implementing Plants in your home can help improve your indoor air quality. So place a few living plants in the appropriate hospitable locations of your home over several fake plants and flowers. If you’re concerned about your lack of a green thumb, here are a few suggestions that are easy to care for during winter. • In an Overly-Heated Room: Cacti and Desert Plants • In a Dry Room: Aloe or Fiddle Leaf Fig Trees • In a Dry Room: Philodendrons or Succulents • In a Low-Light Room: Chinese Evergreen, or Aglaonema • In a Drafty Room: Christmas Cactus or Jade Plants 2. Too Much Granite Granite is a popular option when choosing kitchen counters, but avoid going overboard by adding accents such as quartz or butcher block countertop for your kitchen island and workspace. 3. Industrial Everything Industrial home decor has been popular for decades; Edison bulbs, exposed brick, rusted or brushed metal accents are a few examples of this decor design. However, there is such a thing as too much industrial. If you want to go for an industrial look inside of your home, add a couple of elements such as modern pendant lights or a pegboard backsplash. 4. All Grey Everything Adding to the Industrial trend we’ve listed prior to this, all grey rooms can sometimes make a room feel dull and life-less in contrary to creating a calming and minimal environment. If it is too late to re-paint your walls or you absolutely adore your grey furniture, try adding in some vivid colored plants or wall decor that is an appropriate fit for the type room. 5. Vertical Blinds Vertical blinds can be a pain to open, close, and can become tangled easily. So most home decor enthusiasts update to mini blinds, DIY window treatments, and lightweight curtains to preserve the abundant natural sunlight in their homes. 6. Indoor Wicker Furniture Wicker furniture is typically a top choice for your balcony or porch, so keep the wicker outside. When used indoors, wicker is one of those home trends that can quickly make a home look dated. 7. Carriage hinges Carriage Hinges are most popularly found on tilt-up retractable garage doors that usually do not open like shed doors. This trend could make your home garage feel more like a barn shed as opposed to a destination for your vehicle. 8. Tuscan-Inspired Kitchens A popular kitchen design trend for just about two decades, but Tuscan kitchens are starting to lose their appeal. Instead of lots of stone and darker colors, today’s kitchens focus on brighter lighting and a crisp color palette for home trends. 9. Brass Hardware Metals may be in when it comes to accessories, but avoid shiny brass as it can make a kitchen look dated. Instead, replace cabinet hardware with brushed nickel, glass or stainless steel. 10. Bold Appliances Bold kitchen colors are on-trend, but avoid choosing bright colors for appliances. You wouldn’t put a ’70s avocado green or goldenrod refrigerator in your kitchen now, so just imagine how that bold red or seafoam green appliance will in a few years. We hope this list is helpful to your home modernization, we anticipate the various point of views about trendy home decor. Please let us know what your thoughts are in the comment section below, or tag us in your post on any social platform!   more...

10/22/2019

Essential Winter Home Maintenance Checklist

Essential Winter Home Maintenance Checklist

As the brisk winds of winter approach us, Advent Properties is here to keep you updated on how you can prepare to keep your home warm, cozy, clean and sturdy! For your safety, and to avoid damage to your property inside and out; it is best to routinely clean your microwave and oven, range hood filters, unclog sink and drain holes, replace heater filter, and check smoke alarms and fire extinguishers on a monthly basis.
Cleaning your heater system, windows, and running water to flush toilets in unused spaces should be done on a quarterly basis. However, the following home maintenance tasks done to prepare your home for the Winter season will help you stay ahead of any property damage inside and out of your home.   more...

10/09/2019

AB 1482: California's New Tenant Protection Act

AB 1482: California's New Tenant Protection Act

Governor Gavin Newsome signed AB 1482 on Tuesday, October 8th, 2019. This new bill implements Just Cause for Eviction and Rent Cap across the State of California. The State of Oregon approved legislation similar to this February 28th, 2019. The new bill is intended to end rent gouging and senseless evictions. However, it does not prohibit cities and counties from creating new legislation or other ordinances that are uncompromising regarding rent caps. The law sunsets on January 1, 2030, so until then here are the highlights from the latest California New Tenant Protection Act:
Statewide rent cap: AB 1482 by Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, will place an annual 5% plus CPI cap on rent increases and create new standards for evictions across California. The signing of AB 1482, officially the Tenant Protection Act of 2019, marks the most significant policy change for California’s rental housing owners and tenants in a quarter-century.   more...

09/24/2019

Always be learning, growing...

Always be learning, growing...

"REimagine" 2019 Real Estate Conference
This week, I'm at the California Association Realtors conference in Los Angeles. I'm here to learn more about the Real Estate and Property Management industries. As you're probably aware the real estate market and political arena are constantly changing.   more...

09/18/2019

We love our owners, and it shows!

We love our owners, and it shows!

Property management is not the most glamorous or easy job. Our owners are what make us do a good job. We love when they let us know that we are successful.
Check out a card dropped by our office by a greatful owner.   more...

09/18/2019

Quick guide to Oakland Rent Control as of September 2019 Part 2

Quick guide to Oakland Rent Control as of September 2019 Part 2

Knowledge is power. Property Management is difficult. We are here to assist.
Rely on our expert knowledge of rent control laws to assist you in the management of your property.   more...

09/18/2019

Quick guide to Oakland Rent Control as of September 2019 Part 1

Quick guide to Oakland Rent Control as of September 2019 Part 1

Check out these updated guidelines for Oakland Rent Control. Contact Darryl Glass for more information at 510.500.7531 or dglass@adventpropertiesinc.com
  more...

09/03/2019

You Can't Beat The Best! Spectrum Community Services presents Throwdown trophy

You Can't Beat The Best! Spectrum Community Services presents Throwdown trophy

"You Can't Beat The Best"
Advent Properties was graced with the presence of Lara Calvert and Charles Deterline of Spectrum Community Services to present our trophy from the "Feed The Need Tailgate Throwdown"   more...

09/12/2018

Rent Range Values for 2018 Updates

Noticeably with recent research, rents have been down in Berkeley and Oakland. With vacancies and aggressive marketing tactics people still can’t afford to live in the newly built apartments/ lofts that have been sprouting up across the East Bay. After rents have been increasing over recent years, they started to decline in June and have dropped ever since. Two industry groups – Apartment List and Zumper – are reporting that median rents in Berkeley fell anywhere from 3.8% to 15.9% in 2017, and dropped from 10.9% to a shocking 15% in Oakland. In contrast to those reports, rents went up in 8 of the largest 10 cities including Concord, Walnut Creek and Pleasant Hill, and El Cerrito, according to Zillow. Per an article from Zillow, Sam Sorokin, a Manager of about 1,000 apartments in Berkeley and Oakland confirmed the industry reports of rents dropping, although believed the decline was a mere 5.8%. He calculated that number by looking at people who first started renting in August 2016 and moved out in August 2017. His company ultimately had to lower rents to attract tenants. Something’s up,” said Sorokin. “All the economic indicators are great: strong job market, good wages, we’re not in a recession. Things just aren’t renting for as much.”“Sorokin said he thinks the drop in rents reflects what he and other building advocates have long been saying: constructing more housing creates more competition, which lowers rents.”“In 2017, a tipping point has happened,” said Sorokin. “The new construction has caused the rents to decline. There is no other reason I can think of.” (www.berkeleyside.com) Most of the newer apartments are aimed toward upper-income residents. They offer amenities like bamboo floors, stainless steel appliances, views, decks and in-house or nearby gyms. The recent complexes that have been completed in Berkeley in the past three years include: The Dwight and Garden Village (both on Dwight Way) Stonefire Apartments on Milvia Street, Addison Arts and Avalon Berkeley (both on Addison Street), The Higby on San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley Apartments-Touriel and the Aquatic (both on University Avenue) and Varsity Berkeley on Durant Avenue. According to the article on www.berkeleyside.com, “When these upscale complexes were first completed the apartments were snapped up because there was a pent-up demand for newer units”, said Sorokin. Many foreign students at UC Berkeley, whose parents could afford to pay high rents, moved in.” “These people paying high tuition – their parents are loaded,” said Sorokin. “They don’t want to live in some funky, ’60s style apartment. They want nice places.” But now that so many of these units are available, the demand has dropped, he said. Units are sitting empty. So some property managers are offering a month’s free rent or are dropping prices to lure new tenants. Developers are feeling the pressure to fill buildings, too. They want to convert their more expensive construction loans to traditional bank loans, and that cannot happen until a complex is filled, he said. Lowered rents reflect those pressures. (www.berkeleyside.com)   more...

05/30/2018

What Makes New Oakland Buyout Ordinance so Important?

The Oakland City Council has passed the Tenant Move Out Agreement Ordinance (“Ordinance”.) This new law significantly changes the way landlords can approach and buy out tenants residing in their rental units. It is important to note that the Ordinance applies to all rental units in Oakland, including units otherwise exempt from rent or eviction controls, like single family homes and new construction. The only exemption is for publicly-owned and operated housing units, which typically operate under different tenancy laws anyways. The law will also not be applicable to situations where there is no “tenancy”, such as giving money to a family member to move out, or paying a “squatter” to vacate property they have taken over. The Ordinance is effective May 1, 2018.   Before Buyout   Disclosure Form   Landlords may no longer offer buyouts to tenants informally or on the spot. Landlords must undertake a robust disclosure process and register with Oakland’s Rent Adjustment Program (RAP) before making any buyout offer. Even accidentally violating the Ordinance can incur penalties of at least $500 per violation, in addition to any violations of the overlapping Tenant Protection Ordinance. Compliance with the Ordinance requires service on the tenant of a form developed by the RAP. The Disclosure Form is currently available on the RAP website. This Disclosure Form enumerates an extensive list of tenants’ rights in buyout negotiations, such as: The tenant can refuse to negotiate a buyout. The tenant may rescind the buyout (change their mind) up to 25 days after signing the agreement (but cannot rescind once they actually move out.) The tenant may be entitled to the relocation payments. The landlord is required to keep careful records of the Disclosure Form. Once executed by the landlord, the form must be provided to the tenant within 3 days, with proof of service. Copies of each form and the corresponding proof of service must be retained in the landlord’s records for at least 5 years. It will be convenient for many landlords to issue this form upon the commencement of a tenancy, as part of the rental agreement. Please note that although the form prepared by the RAP contains a space for the tenant to sign to confirm receipt, this signature appears to be for record keeping purposes only. The landlord’s obligation to disclose is complete when this form is delivered to the tenant, regardless if it is accepted – hence the landlord’s obligation to keep a record of service for 5 years.   Certification Form   In addition to disclosure to the tenant prior to negotiations, the landlord must also register with the RAP by filing a Certification Form. This form includes the owner’s name and contact information, the unit which may be subject to buyout negotiations, the date that the tenant in the unit received the Disclosure Form, and the dates of any other move out agreements “with any current or prior tenants at the property” “completed to the best of the owner’s recollection and knowledge.” The Certification Form is also available on the RAP website. There appears to be no limit to how far back in time landlords must go when reporting prior buyout negotiations. It is also unclear what the penalty might be if the landlord incorrectly identifies or omits a buyout negotiation with a current or prior tenant, but the Ordinance does authorize the City Attorney to file civil actions against landlords who violate any provision of the Ordinance. Landlords should note that the registration information collected pursuant to the Ordinance may be released, published, or otherwise made publicly available, which may or may not have personal information redacted. The City explicitly does not guarantee that personal or private information will not be released, including information contained within the buyout agreements themselves. Landlords should consider carefully what personal or business information they disclose on any papers filed with the City.   During Buyout   Formation   The Ordinance provides several steps to standardize buyout agreements. First, the Ordinance requires all agreements be in writing, and in Spanish or Chinese if the tenant is proficient in those languages rather than English. In the case of a rental agreement not in English, the buyout agreement would be in the language of the rental agreement. If the buyout agreement is in multiple languages, all copies should be presented to the tenant at the same time, rather than a belated translation afterward. When signed, a copy of the agreement is to be given to “each” tenant “immediately” following execution. It is unclear what giving a copy “immediately” means, especially when there may be multiple tenants involved in the buyout, but landlords may wish to arrange the signing of the agreement in a place where a copy machine is available, with all tenants present, so that there is minimal delay. Landlords are required to create and retain a proof of service of this executed copy of the agreement for an unspecified period of time. Second, the Ordinance requires certain recitals of tenants’ rights verbatim from the Ordinance, which generally correspond to the disclosures required before the buyout negotiations. This language is to be in 14 point font above the tenant’s signature, although it would likely fill at least an entire page all by itself. See Sections 8.22.740.B.1-6 of the Oakland Municipal Code, available at the RAP website, for the precise language to use. Third, the Ordinance requires that agreements “must be for greater than the amount of the relocation payments to which the tenant may be entitled under Oakland, state, or federal law.” This appears to impose some kind of floor on the value paid under the Ordinance, but this vague language is unclear on what the floor would be. As of the date of this article, relocation payments are required for landlords who evict tenants to move into the unit (owner move-in), when tenants are displaced to remediate code violations, following condo conversions, or when the property is being removed from the rental market under the Ellis Act. However, because a buyout may occur without (or instead of) any of those circumstances, it is uncertain if those require payments are implicated by this Ordinance. Landlords are therefore recommended to pay at least 1 cent more than the amounts enumerated in the Uniform Relocation Ordinance to avoid a potential violation.   Rescission   Under the Ordinance, tenants have an absolute right to rescind an agreement after they sign it. By default, tenants may rescind up to 25 days after signing. However, they can agree to reduce the rescission period to 15 days. To rescind, the tenant must notify the landlord in writing, and if there are multiple tenants, all tenants must agree. Mailed rescissions are effective if they are postmarked on or before the last day of the rescission period, and all money paid under the buyout must be refunded to the landlord. If the tenant determines that the buyout agreement is defective in some way under the Ordinance, the rescission period is extended to six months. In the written notice of rescission, the tenant must explain the defects in the agreement. After receiving notice, the landlord has 5 days to “offer the unit back to the tenant or respond with reasons why the Move Out Agreement may not be rescinded.” However, the Ordinance also states that a tenant may not rescind a buyout after they move out, even if the buyout was defective. The contradiction between the landlord’s stated obligation to offer the unit back to the tenant after rescission, and the tenant’s inability to claim rescission after vacating has no clear answer and may have to be resolved through further regulations or litigation. Since tenants still have civil remedies available in the case of vacating following a defective buyout agreement, landlords should consult with an attorney before allowing a tenant back into the unit following vacancy and rescission.   After Buyout   After an agreement is negotiated and completed, the landlord must file the buyout agreement with the RAP between 25-45 days. This means the landlord must wait the full statutory rescission period (25 days), and then has 20 days to file the agreement (45 days total). Landlords should mark their calendars and set a reminder to avoid missing this deadline, and remember that the information contained in the agreements may become public at a future date. Rescinded agreements are not filed with the RAP and may be discarded. However, the fact that buyout negotiations occurred in that unit must be disclosed on any certification form filed with the RAP.   Enforcement   Penalties for violating the Ordinance are steep. The City is empowered to levy fines and file civil suits against landlords who violate the Ordinance, even if no tenant complains. If a tenant does have a complaint for a landlord violating the Ordinance, the landlord is liable for any actual damages to the tenant, or $500, whichever is greater. If the landlord “willfully” violated the Ordinance, then the penalty is triple actual damages, or $1,000, whichever is greater. Elderly or disabled tenants may always claim triple actual damages, or $1,000 or $1,500 minimum damages for each non-willful or willful violation, respectively. Catastrophically ill tenants are entitled to even more, with triple actual damages, or $1,500 or $2,000 for each non-willful or willful violation, whichever is greater. If the landlord wishes to challenge a tenant’s claim of protected status and enhanced penalties, the landlord can challenge that status using the same procedure as for just cause evictions, and may also raise the issue in a resulting civil proceeding.   Other Provisions   As stated in the disclosure form provided to tenants, landlords should be aware that offering more than one buyout to the same tenant within six months is considered harassment under the Tenant Protection Ordinance, with concordant penalties. Landlords are prohibited from retaliating against tenants who refuse a buyout. If a landlord is considering offering a buyout before issuing a termination notice, expect a retaliation defense if the tenant refuses to vacate following the notice. The Ordinance is somewhat flexible when it comes to landlord/tenant communications and forms of notice. In particular, use of email is acceptable, but only if both sides agree. Landlords who favor electronic communications should consider consent to email as a term to include in rental agreements. Without any agreement, notices served under the ordinance must by registered, first class mail.   Conclusion   As of May 1, 2018, buyout negotiations in Oakland are now nearly as heavily regulated as rent increases or evictions. The RAP is involved both before and after each and every buyout, and all buyouts are now a matter of public record, including any buyouts which preceded the ordinance. All landlords in the city should immediately create a record of their past buyouts, and create an organized file for all the necessary proofs of service. It is clear from the content of the Ordinance that the City and the RAP do not want landlords negotiating buyouts with their tenants. All of the responsibilities for deadlines and disclosures rest on landlords, who risk stiff penalties for even accidental violations. Landlords should consult with an attorney prior to any buyout negotiations to evaluate whether the landlord has fully disclosed, certified, and complied with the Ordinance.     more...

04/04/2018

How to Keep a Competitive Edge in Rental Market

The surplus in rental units in the Bay Area is growing, and it’s more important than ever to keep your unit the cream of the crop when leasing. In the past few years, the Bay Area rental market has been flourishing. With new companies opening and job seekers coming all over the world, it used to be easier to quickly rent out vacant units. However, there has been a trending shift lately. Companies and start-ups are finding alternative cities to plant their roots and places with less expensive leases. And the jobs are going with them. So what does this mean for homeowners with vacancies? With Bay Area rents at an all time high, we could expect rental rates to cool off in the future. The way things are going, and with the current quality of vacant units, there is a surplus of rental units. As property managers, we notice that rental unit competition is getting stiffer. As much as homeowners want to rent out their unit, so do the homeowners next door and down the street. On top of this, in order to stay ahead of the competition, vacant units are increasingly getting full remodels in bathrooms, kitchens and even curb appeal. Here are a few ways to keep your property’s competitive edge in the market and get the most returns on your investment. Bathroom The bathroom is a place of cleanliness, and keeping it simple and clean can help stir a potential tenant’s decision to rent. The good news is you don’t have to break the bank when doing a bathroom remodel. For one, keeping the plumbing where it already saves you a couple thousand dollars. Instead of replacing a whole toilet, replacing the toilet seat and cover can save hundreds of dollars. Lighting also makes a big difference, especially those around vanity mirrors. In addition, a new coat of paint can turn things around nicely as well to give the feeling of novelty. Fans and ventilation upkeep is also important as this helps prevent mold growth. Faucets, countertops, tubs/showers, cabinetry, and flooring are the more costly projects but can make a huge difference when getting a renter. The least that can be done is making sure these amenities are clean. Homeadvisor has a helpful overview guide on costs   Kitchen The most common renovation requests we get in the kitchen are gas/stove range, refrigerator, and cabinetry work. If these appliances were ordered and installed not too long ago, one of the best options is to do a deep clean to give that novel feeling. If we’re talking about full renovations, much of the costs will come from designing, installation, and appliances. Here’s a helpful guide for overview costs Curb Appeal They say you can’t judge a book by its cover, but seeing a well-kept curb appeal can make a huge difference. If you really want to keep a competitive edge in the rental market, make the statement with updated yard and landscaping. Again, you don’t have to break the bank; using low-maintenance plants along with native plants can help keep prospective tenants. Lease Term Flexibility As you know, leases are commonly drawn up as a 1-year deal. However, striking up a different deal may win a prospective tenant over. One popular option we are seeing is a 2-year lease with guaranteed no annual rent increase the following year. Not to mention giving a concession such as half or a whole month off of rent is another common tactic to find tenants. Pet Although owners have a right to not allow pets, this option is becoming more common. We understand that pets may cause some damage to the property, which is why pet deposits exist. Keeping this option open will help bring in a different set of potential tenants.   Copyright © 2017 Advent Properties, Inc.   more...